• Who We Are

  • Schedule

    Mondays ~
    Tuesdays ~ Snarky
    Wednesdays ~ Dreamer
    Thursdays ~ Naughty
    Fridays ~ Dreary
    Saturdays ~
    Sundays ~

    Whenever ~ Smokey, Mighty, Eerie and Wicked

  • Snarky’s Tweets

  • Kinetic’s Tweets

  • Dreamer’s Tweets

  • Wicked’s Tweets

  • Eerie’s Tweets

  • Mighty’s Tweets

Precision in Language

I watched The Giver this weekend with my husband. I have loved the series and thought the movie was well done. One statement they used in the movie was “precision in language”. The parents often reprimanded the children when they were not clear about their feelings. Over the course of the weekend, my husband and I often would correct each other with the same comment, “precision in language,” as a joke. But as I am going through my edits, I find myself time and time again breaking that simple rule.

I often do a word search for some of these culprits: just, well, now, and so. Another nasty one for me is “was”.

For example:

Jim was walking down the path just as a plane flew overhead.

I can cut out “was” and “just” straight off the back. Then add a little show don’t tell to deepen it even more.

Jim walked down the path, when he heard the roar of a plane overhead.

Editing can be tedious and hard, but precision in language makes for a stronger story. Do you have any pitfalls you have to search for in editing?

Writing, a New Team Sport?

Yes, writing is essentially a solitary activity. It usually involves one person in front of their computer or with a pen or pencil in hand.

But in today’s publishing world, it really does take a community to put forth a book. Take a peek at any acknowledgement page and you’ll see a long list of editors, agents, cover artists and such not.

I think writing has evolved even beyond this. I just finished a book, The Iron Trials, by two of my favorite authors Holly Black and Cassandra Clare. More and more authors are teaming up to co-write books. Here is a great article I remember from some time ago by Mark Sullivan who co-authored two books with James Patterson.

I also believe critique groups and editing partners are an invaluable part of the writing process. Last month the evil dwarves gathered around to hash out plot points. We push each other as we question our character’s motivation and pick out any possible plot holes. I relish their critiques even if they sometimes they bruise the ego. “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” Right? Even when the paper is bleeding red. They also help calm the negative voices and help me push through the hard times.

I realize how essential my writing team is. How about you? Who is your support team?

Free Range Organic Zombies Abound

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Greetings and Salutations most reputable readers of the blog,

(deep, intimidating voice of announcer) Eerie’s message has been preempted for this important announcement from Dave Benneman.

If you are a returning visitor to The 7 Evil Dwarves blog site you are accustomed to the chaos the reigns supreme here. We are a critique group from various backgrounds and experiences. We started our joint blog several years ago on a whim. The idea is to keep fresh content up 7 days a week. The fly in the soup is of course that we have no rules. So on any given week you find discussions about honing the craft, or someone sharing a recent experience at a conference, or it may not be related to writing at all. Our content is as diverse as our group. I say this here to encourage you to keep coming back because I’m certain you will find something for you.

My day is Friday. On Fridays you will join Eerie Dwarf and his ragtag band of misfits on a variety of adventures. This is always written off the cuff with much tongue in cheek, strictly for entertainment. Friday is about getting in touch with the my creative brain and your inner child. I hope you get a an opportunity to laugh out loud at Eerie’s antics. It is all in fun.

Sunday is the day we update Swamp Tales, which is a round robin style story where each writer picks up where the last writer left off. It is total chaos with 7 different styles and voices all steering the story for a few paragraphs. Sometimes we will feature guests who want to toss in their two cents. To check it out, click on the Swamp Tales tab.

Because we are writers and insecure by nature please click like if something tickles you. If you’re really moved leave a comment. When you find yourself dumbstruck, tell your friends. If any of these things happens regularly you might want to become a follower. This is the only way we can learn what you like.

(Announcer, a little less intimidating this time) Now returning to the regularly scheduled programming, already in progress.

“I’m coming as fast as I can Mischievous, not all of us were born with wings you know.”

“Not only do you not have wings, you were short-changed in the leg department too. If I were you I’d hire C.Rock Adile to sue for Legligence.” Mischievous flies into a tree he’s laughing so hard. “Ouch, that smarts.”

“It serves you right for making fun of my stature.” Eerie looks up to see his guests have finally arrived. “Oh hello folks. Give us a few minutes there seems to problem with our herd of zombies.”

“Hurry, you can see the corral from here.” Mischievous hops up and down pointing.

Eerie stops in his tracks. “What happened here? Where are the Zombies?”

“I don’t know. They were here last night. This morning I found the gate unlocked.”

“This is terrible.”

“I know I have an order to ship tomorrow for The Walking Dead. Where am I going to get 25 Free Range Organic Zombies (registered Trademark) in time to ship tomorrow.”

“I think your missing the bigger picture. When did you feed them last?”

“Yesterday, why?”

“So we have how many hungry Zombies wandering around.”

“There were 97  yesterday.”

RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

“This is bad. This really bad. Go check that new Zombie restaurant that opened last week. If they’re hungry, maybe we’ll catch them there.”

“And what do you propose I do if I find them. Now that they’ve tasted freedom, so to speak, I don’t think they’ll come back because I ask them nicely.”

“You keep an eye on them. I’ll gather the muses. If anyone can get them back in the cages it’s them. Now go. What are you waiting for.”

“Your not getting HER too, are you?” Mischievous’ voice shakes.

“Of course, if Wicked can spare her. Don’t worry, she was kidding about needing a new feather pillow.”

“Maybe the zombies will get the best of her, then I won’t have worry at all. Although I bet she’s too tough for our Free Range Organic Zombies taste.”

“Stop stalling, the sooner we get them back where they belong the better.” Mischievous alights in a rustle of ebony. “As you can see folks we’re kind of busy today. I’ll issue you all free passes to return next week. In the mean time, be careful on your way home. Zombies abound.”

As is our custom on Friday, I leave you with a quote. (some weeks it may be the only thing worth showing up for).

“Let’s do what you fear most
. That from which you recoil
, but which still makes your eyes moist”  Lou Reed

Write On,

Eerie Dwarf AKA Dave Benneman

 

 

 

 

 

NaNo Comes to an End, and Life Resumes as Normal

 

NaNo has come to an end.  I wasn’t able to meet my goal of 50,000 words, but there is always next year!  It was, however, a wonderful experience and really reminded me of how much writing I can get done if I prioritize it a little better.  How did you do?

It has been nearly a month without critiquing my fellow writer’s work, and without having my own work critiqued, so I have been very excited to get back to business as usual.  Our first night of critiques went really well.  I had thought, based upon my own writing, that our NaNo work wouldn’t be written at quite the same level it usually is, but everyone had wonderful submissions.

This got me thinking… if my fellow writers, some of whom have taken long breaks from writing, can write this quality of work in a month, what really holds us back as writers?  I think many of us struggle, feeling that our work isn’t good enough or isn’t going the way we want it to, but maybe just pressing forward and actually writing is half the battle.  Maybe when we get out of our heads and just write continuously, our work won’t be perfect, but it will get done, and often will be better than we even imagined.

So, I learned a valuable lesson during my first NaNo: most of the excuses we use to keep ourselves from writing are just that, excuses, and if we truly want to be writers, we need to push them aside and just focus on making writing a constant part of our lives.

Let’s Try This Again

Okay, fair warning, don’t eat while you read this blog because for some reason analogies of festering wounds have been coming to me regarding this topic. Well, this week I had an epiphany: I realized that whereas I liked the general storyline of my WIP, there were certain elements that I no longer felt were a good idea. Also, I realized that I had some of those pesky little holes in my overall plot. The other evil dwarves don’t seem to think “it just does” is a good answer when they question the dynamics of my world building. 

I know that everything is fixable, but at the same time after being with the group for a few months, I realize there are certain things I would like to add to the story, and that my setting isn’t working for me. Plus those lovely dwarves have also been helping me with formatting (my current formatting skills are lacking). So with all of these various items weighing on my mind, it became a bit overwhelming. Cue the epiphany.

Time for a rewrite. This WIP is one of those I have gone back and forth to over the years because while I loved the story idea, I wasn’t 100% sure where it was going. In retrospect, after joining a critique group, I know why I wasn’t sure, because the story has issues. So as not to disappoint those who set aside their lunch: a good story is like a wound. The initial idea is when the injury first occurs and the closing of said wound is when all of a writer’s plotting comes together perfectly. If a writer has a deep enough connection with a reader,  a nice scar may be left behind, and the reader will never forget your story. On the other hand, sometimes stories don’t close up well and they start to fester. You ignore them until you realize you can no longer deal with the infection,and at this point you can amputate (give up on the story if you’re sure nothing else you do can fix it), or you can tear off the scab, clean the wound, and start over. I’m choosing the latter.

So I bought Scrivener as I believe it will help help me with at least a general outline (I’m a bit of a panster) and organizing my research. So today is to new beginnings. I’ve got a fresh band aid so let’s close this one up.

 

Perfection is so hard to acheive…

The other day our highly intelligent and quite demanding Snarky Dwarf sent me a link to a blog post. 

http://kriswrites.com/2012/06/27/the-business-rusch-perfection/

Here’s the thing, this post was just what I needed to read at this particular moment. With two books out there, and working on a third, I’m starting to recognize that there are a couple of stages in the writing game every writer goes through.  The first one comes after you begin to fall from that high of being published and seeing your first work out there–all alone in the big bad world of readers, where it can be raised up and kicked down faster than lightning.  You try not to get obsessive about the reviews, feedback and those pesky things known as ratings, but those little voices manage to wiggle their way in and tear bits and pieces off of your creativity.  Together those small things gain strength, and so the debilitating question looms on your writing horizon—can I really manage to write another book?

Answer: Hell, yeah you can.  You’re a writer, stop worrying about what’s being said out there.  You’re out there. Readers are reading you. You have to be doing something right. So in a truly horribly NY/Bronx accent “Forget about it!” and write your story.  Take the things you’ve learned with your first book, do them better or fix them in your second.

Once I made it through and got the second book done, it was time to tackle the third.  This was hard because I was leaving behind the familiarity of Raine and Gavin to focus on another character, Xander.  Granted she has some of the same things that makes Raine, well Raine, but she uniquely herself.  It took me longer than expected to get Xander and Warrick’s story off the ground.  Now that I’m about 100 pages in, it’s starting to come together…bit by bit. 

Yet while I’m crafting this story, I’m still getting feedback on Shadow’s Edge and Shadow’s Soul.  I know you’ll never please all your readers all of the time, but it is so easy to fall into the downward spiral of  “OMG, I need to change this…” or “Maybe I should do this instead…” Second guessing ourselves is not productive, not even a little bit.

Reading Kris’s post as she discusses when is your book truly done…I so needed to hear her when she said,

“I’m here to tell you this: If you want a career as a writer, ignore your critics.

When the book is finished, when the book is published for heaven’s sake, then it’s done. Irrevocably done. Mistakes and all.”

So now, I make it a point not to obsess over rankings or critiques–readers will either love it or hate it, it’s out there, I’m not changing it.  For now, all I can do as a writer, is take what I’ve learned, and use it for Shadow’s Moon.  And the mistakes I make in that story, I’ll just use those to make the next one even better. 

I’m a writer, but I won’t be much of one if I don’t learn and grow from my screw-ups.  Besides, who knows, maybe one of those screw-ups will turn into a flash of genius!

What’s in a name?

Welcome back, all! Sorry for the disappearing act last week.  Wish I could tell you the reason behind it involved fame and fortune, instead it was more along the lines of bills were due and if I want the ability to pay them to continue I must fulfill my oath to the cubicle gods and do what I promised. So I did.  All week long.  I even survived the strange liquid they call “rain” for it.  Oh the sacrifices I make.

Enough wallowing…on to our last editing piece of advice–the usage of names.

I’m not sure about other writers, but I snagged slots of time where I can to sneak away and put my stories to paper (or input into a computer, as the case may be).  The drawback to this approach is that while your story’s timeline maybe cruising right along, your writing timeline is not.  Therefore, what eventually reads as a mere five minutes for your characters across five pages, in reality took you two weeks to get down just right.  In this strange time warp of writing, I found that I have a tendency to think my readers may forget who they’re reading about. Probably because I’m so frustrated by various bumps and detours in those five pages, I’d rather give up and start with fresh new characters.  In a whole new story.  But I digress.

Imagine how shocked I was when one of my brilliant editors pointed out, quite gently and so compassionately, that perhaps I needed to discover the word “she” and “he” once more as prospective readers may suffer severe brain damage from being bashed continually over the head with my character names.  Mortification was immediate.  Said brilliant editor, then went on to explain that the words “she” and “he” are invisible to the readers unless you start too many sentences with those pronouns.

In keeping with my sharing actually examples, here’s my last one for you from Shadow’s Edge (if you want more, you’ll have to buy it when it comes out in November!)

Gavin came at her in a blur. Barely blocking his first hit, she responded with a snapping series of punches and kicks then dodged back out of reach. He pursued her. His hands struck out, followed by a quick foot-sweep.

She landed on her back, twisted to the side, crouched, and got her feet set, before kicking out. A solid hit to his thigh knocked him off balance just enough for her to pull back and set up for her next move. Back and forth they moved, focused and deadly, the silence broken by occasional grunts and the thick sound of flesh hitting flesh. Fifteen minutes later, they stepped back and bowed to each other.

Raine, chest heaving, was grateful to see Gavin breathing equally hard. There would be bruises and aches tomorrow, but the rage was banked for now, leaving her calmer, steadier. She met his eyes and found an echo of the primitive joy she always felt after a fight. Watching Gavin in predator mode touched her primal female core. Without thinking she gave him a fierce grin, receiving a similar baring of teeth.

“So, now that the preliminaries are out of the way,” she said. “What next?”

Gavin chuckled and shook his head. “You’re one of the few females I know, Raine, that gets off on fighting.”

“Hey a girl has to have a hobby.” Raine’s voice was muffled as she wiped the sweat off her face with a towel. “You have to admit it was fun.”

“It’s definitely one way to blow off a little steam.” Grabbing his own towel, he began to wipe his chest. Her eyes caught the motion.  Her breath hitched briefly before steadying out. His chest was truly fascinating, but looking was a dangerous indulgence, especially right now. However, her silent warning did not stop her damn hormones from clamoring for attention.

“I can think of other things that work just as well, if not better,” he offered, his voice darker, seductive. The flare of arousal in his green eyes let her know she’d been caught staring. “Like what you see?”

More than he’d ever know. “It’s distracting, but I’ll live,” she responded, knowing this attraction was a mess, just waiting to happen.

In this scene, if we remove a few proper names we get a more fluid scene.

He came at her in a blur. Barely blocking his first hit, she responded with a snapping series of punches and kicks then dodged back out of reach. He pursued her. His hands struck out, followed by a quick foot-sweep.

She landed on her back, twisted to the side, crouched, and got her feet set, before kicking out. A solid hit to his thigh knocked him off balance just enough for her to pull back and set up for her next move. Back and forth they danced, focused and deadly, the silence broken by occasional grunts and the thick sound of flesh hitting flesh. Fifteen minutes later, they stepped back and bowed to each other.

Raine, chest heaving, was grateful to see Gavin breathing equally hard. There would be bruises and aches tomorrow, but the rage was banked for now, leaving her calmer, steadier. She met his hooded gaze and found an echo of the primitive joy she always felt after a fight. Watching Gavin in predator mode touched her primal feminine core. Without thinking she gave him a fierce grin, receiving a similar baring of teeth.

“So, now that the preliminaries are out of the way,” she said. “What next?”

He chuckled and shook his head. “You’re one of the few females I know that gets off on fighting.”

“Hey a girl has to have a hobby.” Her voice was muffled as she wiped the sweat off her face with a towel. “You have to admit it was fun.”

“It’s definitely one way to blow off a little steam.” Grabbing his own towel, he began to wipe his chest. Her eyes caught the motion and her breath hitched briefly before steadying out. His chest was truly fascinating, but looking was a dangerous indulgence, especially right now. However, her silent warning did not stop her damn hormones from clamoring for attention.

“I can think of other things that work just as well, if not better,” he offered, his voice darker, seductive. The flare of arousal in his green eyes let her know she’d been caught staring. “Like what you see?”

More than he’d ever know. “It’s distracting, but I’ll live,” she responded, knowing this attraction was a mess, just waiting to happen.

So now that we’ve covered some of the basic editing rules in the last few weeks, go forth, prepare and get ready to write.  Besides, NANO is just around the corner. Put your new-found skills to work and create your masterpiece!
Until next week! I’m going to go enjoy my Blood Red Eerie brought me!
Wicked

It’s hell on the weak when the strong are around…

We’re almost to the end of the editing tips journey, aren’t you happy?  This visit I thought we’d examine the infuriating world of strong versus weak, or what some like to call, active versus passive.  Many of us spent years in English class learning the difference between verbs that sit there and do nothing and those that rise to the top and poke your eyes out. 

Every writer faces this challenge and every reader has hit those passages that make them want to scream, “Just do it already!”.   No writer wants their reader to get bored and move on. That is not our goal as story tellers. We want our readers to stay up late through the night to finish “…just one more page” regardless of the fact that at the crack of dawn you have a meeting your entire career hinges upon.  That’s why there’s such thing as coffee and make-up.  It’s so much easier to dump artifical nerves and spackle on skin tone cover up to dimish the impact of exhaustion.

The key to recognizing and beating the crap out of passive voice is not to add -ing to every verb in your sentence, but to make your sentences do something.  For example, in Shadow’s Edge (deal with folks, it’s my first book and this is where all the really good lessons are coming from!) my editors kindly pointed out this particular sentence was way too passive:

Natasha’s look was unfriendly.

The best way to smack that line into submission and make it do something:

Natasha threw her an unfriendly look.

Can you hear the difference?  The first draft is almost eerily (No,E,  I’m not calling you home from the Werewolf Monastary! By the way, bring me back some Blood Red!) to close to telling versus showing.  See how well all these little pointers merge together!

Here’s another example (yep, from Shadow’s Edge):

Gavin and Talbot continued talking for couple of minutes.  Then Talbot was shaking Gavin’s hand and saying good night to Raine.

A few tweaks and viola! New and improved:

Gavin and Talbot continued talking for a couple of minutes.  Then Talbot shook Gavin’s hand and said good night to Raine.

See how it moves your scene, makes it more “real”?  Using the word “was” means you’ve begun to travel down that passive trail and meander into some boring territory. Spice it up, people. Kick it around, make it scream for your readers. 

So remember, when your writing starts to chicken out, put it in a cage fight and knock “was” out of the ring.  Trust me, you’re readers will love you for it!

–Wicked

Let me show you what I mean…

I promised to share the agony of editing with you, so sit down, strap in and hang on.  We’re now heading into the treacherous world of show-don’t-tell. You all know this pit of despairing darkness, it’s the one where someone reads your work then says, “Why are you telling me this, why can’t you just show me?”  Every writer faces this harsh enemy armed only with a small writing instrument and sheer guts.  Some carry a broader defense in the form of a laptop, but still the enemy is fierce and determined to leave you shuddering in its wake. 

There are thousands (seriously google it) of articles out there on how to work through the challenges of showing versus telling, but I’m an orbitally fixated person (see previous blog) so I’m just going to share an example of enlightment that was seared into my brain.

Here’s the original:

Raine moved like lightening to catch the little black remote before it hit the ground. Eden gave a frustrated shriek and went after Ryder’s face with her long nails, scoring three long scratches before her could stop her.

 Ryder cursed, yanking the doctor’s arms behind her back, forcing her to face forward.  Raine didn’t spare Eden a glance, but moved in to the cell. She could feel Cheveyo coming up behind her. Using her magic, Raine called up a small illuminating ball of light to chase back the darkness from the cell.

Huddled in the corner was a naked Gavin. Fresh cuts, seeping burns, and trickles of blood mixed with sweat-drenched, tangled hair made macabre abstracts over the shaking arms, wrapped around drawn up legs.

The enlightened minds of my editors pointed out the following issues with this small passage. For example in the very first line, saying she moved like lightening is telling, not showing.  Then on to the usage of verbs. Picking the right verb makes a world of difference. Action scenes demand strong verbs, use them but don’t -ing them (will face this little critter in the next blog).  With the light of knowledge searing my brain, here is the re-write:

Raine sprang forward and caught the little black remote before it hit the ground. Eden shrieked and  raked Ryder’s face with her long nails, scoring three long gashes before he could stop her.

He cursed and yanked her  arms behind her back, forcing her to face forward. Without sparing her a glance, Raine dashed into the cell with Cheveyo right behind her. She summoned a small ball of light to chase back the darkness from the cell.

Gavin was huddled in the corner, naked. Fresh cuts, seeping burns, and trickles of blood, mixed with sweat-drenched, tangled hair threw macabre abstracts over his shaking arms, which were wrapped around his drawn-up legs.

See how much better that reads? Plus it paints a more vivid picture of what’s happening for the reader.  This is the beauty of showing versus telling. It’s worth every drop of blood you sweat as you transfer those voices in your head to paper. 

So next week, I’ll move on to passive versus active.  Oh ye old English lessons. Dust them off, it’s time to go back to school!

Wicked

There is more to the world than meets the eye

Alright, I have survived three rounds of edits by three wonderfully sharp individuals for my first book Shadow’s Edge.  We are getting nearer and nearer to that terribly exciting moment of both nerves, joy and fear known as “the release date”.   Now that my editing vision has been seared by the light, what have I learned?

First, I am orbitally fixated.  Let me offer a translation.  I’m a pretty visual person.  When I write, my story is like a movie in my head most times.  I can stop the film, back it up, tweak it, and play again until it’s just the way I want it.  Unfortunately this means that I will use a great deal of visual detail in my book.  I never realized until it was pointed out to me, just how much I relied on looks to get emotions across.  The first strong advice I was given: Vary your emotional clues, there is more to a person’s reactions than their eyes.  Go out, people watch and make a list of body reactions which will clue a reader into a person’s emotional state.

So, being the dutiful writer I am, I headed my wise editor’s advice and took the day off to people watch. The sacrifices one has to make for art, I’m telling you, it’s horrific.  I found a table, plugged in my headphones to add the appropriate soundtrack and armed with pen and paper, began to document my experiences.  You know what? She was absolutely right, you can get emotion across with involving your eyes.

We have five (six if you think outside the box) senses: smell, hearing, vision, taste, touch (and intuitive). When I write I find myself sticking to one sort of sense, the changing of tones in people’s voices, using only their eyes to express themselves, etc. and forgetting there’s more to life than what meets the eye.  It’s the whole sensory experience that helps created mood, setting and draw you into a character’s life until it’s more interesting than the real world.

Here’s a re-write example.

The original was:

She could smell the metallic stink of fear rising from Eden, and she reveled in the dark joy killing this human would bring her. The whimpers escaping from Eden’s bloodless lips added a savage spark of satisfaction to Raine’s soul. She made quick work of the remaining two restraints.

With the doctor strapped to the table, Raine looked around the room. Spotting a number of syringes, loaded with some clear liquid, lying in the cooling unit and brought a small vicious smile to her face. 

While the table’s frightened occupant watched her every move, she walked around and took  one of the syringes out of the unit. She was sure her eyes were glowing with predatory delight as Eden’s breath noticeably  hitched.

 “Now what could this little syringe hold that scares you so much?” Raine’s voice was a purr of malice as she dragged a small backless chair over to Eden’s left side.

Sitting down, she noted Eden’s eyes never left the syringe in her hand. Making sure to keep the small instrument in clear view, she kept her voice calm and even. “Where shall we start, hmm?” She tapped the syringe lightly against her other palm.

The edited version:

She could smell the metallic stink of fear radiating from Eden, and she reveled in the satisfaction   killing this human would bring her. The whimpers escaping from Eden’s bloodless lips added a savage spark of glee to Raine’s soul as she made quick work of the remaining two restraints.

With Eden strapped to the table, Raine looked around the room. She spotted a number of syringes, loaded with some clear liquid, lying in the cooling unit and smiled viciously. 

While Eden’s terrified eyes followed her every move, Raine strode over and grabbed one of the syringes out of the unit. She knew her eyes glowed with predatory delight when Eden’s breath hitched.

Raine dragged a small, backless chair over to Eden’s left side. “Now what could this little syringe hold that scares you so much?” she asked, her voice a purr of malice .

Eden’s eyes never left the syringe.

Making sure to hold the small instrument in clear view, Raine kept her voice calm and even. “Where shall we start? Hmm?” She tapped the syringe lightly against her palm.

See how much better the edited version turned out? Change a few description and tenses and viola! Your readers are hooked.  And this is why editors rock, because they can see your words and shift them just that little bit to make them dazzle the reader’s eye. (Orbitally challenged! I already explained that!)

So for the next few blogs, I thought I’d be nice and share my growing pains with you, because what good is learning lessons if you can’t share the simplistic brilliance with others?

So next week we’ll fall into the debilitating pit of despair writers call “Show versus Tell”.

Until then…

Wicked

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