• Who We Are

  • Schedule

    Mondays ~
    Tuesdays ~ Snarky
    Wednesdays ~ Dreamer
    Thursdays ~ Naughty
    Fridays ~ Dreary
    Saturdays ~
    Sundays ~

    Whenever ~ Smokey, Mighty, Eerie and Wicked

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  • Kinetic’s Tweets

  • Dreamer’s Tweets

  • Wicked’s Tweets

  • Eerie’s Tweets

  • Mighty’s Tweets

Editing Tips- After You Think You’re Done

paper and pencil

You write something awesome, reread and edit it multiple times, maybe get an editor, and you think you’re done, right? Wrong. After being in a critique group for four years, I’ve learned some invaluable things that every writer should consider.

  1. The first time you introduce a character, use his or her name.
    1. Example: “She rolled and struck him in the chest. Hot blood oozed down her hand as his screams filled the air. Heather smiled.”
    2. Instead: “Heather rolled and struck him in the chest. Hot blood oozed down her hand as his screams filled the air. She smiled.”
  2. After that, you can mostly just use pronouns (he or she), unless there are other characters, and it’s getting confusing.
    1. Example: “Heather liked to watch people die. Heather waited until the life drained from their eyes, then went on with her day, feeling like she’d had a dozen cups of coffee.”
    2. Instead: “Heather liked to watch people die. She waited until the life drained from their eyes, then went on with her day, feeling like she’d had a dozen cups of coffee.”
  3. Put down your work for a minimum of a few weeks, so you can read it with fresh eyes.
    1. There have been COUNTLESS times I’ve received feedback and disagreed with it. Then, week or months later, I read my work again and realize I was wrong. When you are too “close” to your work, it’s hard to see the truth.
  4. Read through your work, look specifically at the adjectives and adverbs to see if you are over-using them or could remove them and use a better word.
    1. Example: “She spoke loudly.”
    2. Instead: “She shouted.”
  5. Don’t forget your character’s thoughts and emotions. Without them, you have more of an outline of a story rather than a story.

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Street Team

Street Team

A Street Team is one of the most valuable things an author can have, according to Kevin Kruse. Other writers have stressed this to me over and over again, and yet, I’ve never been given a clear plan on how to actually create one. A few days ago I got my hands on a plan from Kevin Kruse that makes sense, and I’ve been eagerly waiting to share the most important points from his video with all of you.

But first, some of you might be wondering what is a Street Team. It is a group of people who are willing to read the work of an author, often before it is released to the public, and give feedback to the author. Sometimes they catch typos or errors, if that’s how the author wants to use them. But more often than not, they’re people who are ready and willing to leave reviews and “hit the street” for the author, promoting their work as readers and fans.

So how do you create one?

Some ideas:

  • First, authors are always talking about how important a newsletter is. Well, it is important! You can hit up this list, and email everyone on it, looking for people who want to be a part of your Street Team.
  • But how can you get people to sign up for your newsletter? Offering a free gift of some kind, like a book, or goodies, is a great way of encouraging people to sign up.
  • You can also use social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) to simply ask for people who might be willing to join your team.

I’ve started working on my own Street Team, although I’m just starting out. I’ve placed links all over my website, encouraging people to sign up, and offering them a free gift (one of my short stories) for joining. Once I get a good list of people on my newsletter, I’ll reach out to them about joining my team. I’ll let you know how it goes!

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Want to see more of what Kevin Kruse suggests? Check out his video!

Like my post?  Check out my personal blog: Lisa Morrow

Kindle Countdown- A Promotional Tool

You never know if you don’t try. That’s definitely my philosophy when it comes to marketing my work. So this week, I’m trying something new, combined with something I’ve had moderate success with.

Promotions:

  • I’m doing a Kindle Countdown for To Kill a Wizard, which means I’m reducing the price from $2.99 to .99 for one week only.
  • I’m also making The Sea Goddess free tomorrow.
  • (Both of these tools are available for books placed in the KDP Select program.)
  • I’d love to run a promotion for Realm of Goddesses, but it is not currently in the KDP Select program.

In the past, I’ve seen the following results from the giveaways:

  • For every twenty copies I give away, readers buy about one copy of another work.
  • I wouldn’t be too impressed with this, but I always keep in mind that there’s a difference between people downloading my work and actually reading it. Chances are that a lot of the people who picked up free copies still have them sitting in their Kindles, unread, so this isn’t a strategy I think will make me an overnight success.

As for the Kindle Countdown promotional tool, I’ve never used it before. The idea is that Amazon should hopefully have it visible in a few of its lists, and I may get some readers willing to take a chance on my book for .99 versus $2.99.

But as always, I’ll let all of you know how the promotion goes. Have any of you tried it? And if so, did you consider it successful?

The Hard Questions

tree-rings

I was recently asked two questions. I wanted to address them here, because I often see these questions answered by authors, and it always interests me. All of us have come from such different places, and are inspired by such different things. It’s fascinating that so many of us became infatuated with writing.

  1. What made you decide to be a writer?

I don’t remember it ever being a conscious decision. My little sister and I used to share a room, and she’d have trouble going to sleep. I’d make up elaborate stories and tell them to her until she’d fall asleep. I loved creating stories, and she loved hearing them.

My next clear memory is of entering a Halloween writing contest at the library when I was in elementary school. I wrote a story, edited it, and practiced it over and over again. On the day it was due, I went to the library and presented it alongside some adults. I didn’t win, but I realized that I wanted to keep writing stories.

  1. What keeps you going?

I love writing. It isn’t just an escape for me. It’s an essential part of my happiness. When I don’t write, I feel strangely irritated. At first I don’t realize what’s wrong, and then I start writing, and the feeling goes away. I think everyone deserves to have something they are as passionate about as I am about writing.

And in the deepest part of my heart, I also hope that my words might give someone else an escape. That a reader might open up my book and be swept away by my world and characters.

If you haven’t asked yourself these same questions, maybe you should. It was kind of fun to stop and think about the answers.

Today Only “The Sea Goddess” Short Story FREE on Amazon

The Sea Goddess

For today only, I’m going to be giving away my short story “The Sea Goddess” on Amazon. As with all my experiences, I’ll write a blog about this later and let all of you know if it was successful or not. I’ve already had a giveaway for my novel, but I’m curious whether or not a short story will “sell” better or worse than a novel. And I wonder if, because it takes less time to read, I’ll have a better chance at getting more reviews.

Either way, feel free to check it out! Here’s the link: The Sea Goddess on Amazon

Kindle Select- One Day Giveaway (My Experience)

Kindle- Goddess of the Sea Photo

The most important thing to me right now, as a new writer, is to get readers. I want people to enjoy my writing, and I want to hear their feedback, so I know what I can do to continue improving as a writer. So far, I’ve given away a short story on Smashwords and had about 300 downloads over the course of a couple months. Then, recently, I gave my novel “To Kill a Wizard” away for one day on Amazon, and received about 100 downloads. Of all those downloads, I’ve only had a handful of reviews.

So, I’m torn a little (so far) about what I think about giving away my work. It is possible that 400 people have read and loved my work, read it and hated it, or that it is just sitting on their Kindle, waiting to be read. But what I do know, based on my experience, is that giving away my work didn’t have a significant positive impact right away. My hope, at this point, is that these attempts to get my work into readers’ hands will be like everything else in writing, more of a long-term battle.

Like my post?  Check out my personal blog: Lisa Morrow

Plotter verses Pantser

autumn-sky

Some writers plot out each detail of their books long before they’ve even started writing. Other writers don’t plot a thing. They just let their characters guide the story. Still others, like myself, are somewhere in the middle. I’ll share the way I typically write my stories:

  1. I come up with an idea and type up a brief summary.
  2. Immediately, I start writing the first chapter.
  3. Usually I get a few chapters in before I realize I need more guidance.
  4. I go and expand my summary and create sections about the “world” of my novel and the “people” in my novel.
  5. Next, I go and write down the names of each character, find a picture that suits them from the internet, describe their personalities and their physical aspects.
  6. Then, I continue writing.
  7. I usually get a few more chapters in before I realize I need to do a short summary of each chapter.
  8. And that’s it! I keep writing, expanding on the document about my book, so I have it for reference.

Important things I’ve realized:

  • If I plot things out too much, I don’t enjoy writing the story.
  • If I don’t plot out anything, I end up wasting a lot more time.
  • I HAVE to have a word document specifically dedicated to important information about the world I’ve built and the people in it.

So I think I’m somewhere in-between a plotter and a pantser. What kind of a writer are you?

Amazon- One Day Free

Amazon Image

Is anyone else’s stomach twisting like a porcupine’s trying to tear its way out? Oh then, it must just be me. My book, “To Kill a Wizard,” has been out since June 30th, and so far, I’ve only sold a handful of copies. Depressing, right? Well, as a new author, I didn’t expect to be carried on the shoulders of my waves of readers, but I’d hoped for more than this. But then, my initial plans for promoting my book kind of didn’t work out the way I planned. So today, I’m giving away my book for free on Amazon. Which brings me to the topic of today’s blog… I’ll let you know what I did wrong, and then, what I’m trying now when it comes to promoting my book.

Initial plan:

  • Give away a free copy of a short story, in my novel’s world, to generate some readers for the novel.
  • Release “To Kill a Wizard” a few weeks later.
  • Promote on Twitter, Amazon, and blogs.
  • Wait for the orders to roll in.

Okay, so at this point, I’ve had about 300 downloads of my short story from Smashwords and a handful from Amazon. I have no idea how many of those copies have actually been read, but the overall feedback has been excellent. However, not many copies of my book (as I’ve said) were actually purchased after that point. And the big issue, I’d hoped Amazon would “price match” (although they technically say they don’t do that) my short story and make it free on Amazon. Weeks later, they still haven’t, so there is no free story to entice Amazon readers to give my novel a shot.

New Plan:

  • I’m giving away a copy of my novel on Smashwords.
  • I enrolled my novel in KDP Select, at least for the first 90 days.
  • I’m doing a “free day,” where my novel will be free.

So that brings me to my “free day” on Amazon. It’s today! I have no idea how it will go over. Maybe I won’t get a single download. Maybe I’ll get a bunch of them. Either way, I’ll update all of you, so you know whether it was worth it. Wish me luck!

And if you’d like to download my book, check it out at: http://www.amazon.com/Kill-Wizard-Roses-Story-Protectors-ebook/dp/B00X4XR32I/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-1&qid=1436653857

Goodreads Book Giveaway

goodreads

I’m a writer, not a marketing guru, so I feel like I’m constantly scrambling to figure out how to use all of the tools at my disposal. Today is the day my book giveaway should be starting on Goodreads, and I honestly have no idea how it will turn out. In my research, I found mostly contradictory “facts” about how to have a successful campaign. So, I chose the suggestions that worked best with my current situation, which are as follows:

  • Keeping my giveaway short. It’ll only last for one week. But by doing this, I should come up on Goodreads lists as both a giveaway ending soon and a new giveaway. Hopefully, this will bring me more exposure.
  • Giving away one copy of my book. Some authors gave up to fifty copies away, but most later decided to only give away one or two copies, saying the results were close to the same. And as a new writer trying to limit my expenses, I thought testing this marketing strategy with just one book was the smartest way to go.
  • Including an autographed copy. A lot of authors said this encouraged people to enter the giveaway. No idea if this will matter, but I thought it was worth a shot.

I plan to update all of you on the results of my giveaway, so you can benefit from either my success or my failure. If you’re interested in entering the giveaway, you can find it here: https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway

The Mysteries of an Author’s Brain

Neat Glass

My writing ideas come from a variety of different places. A lot of the times, I’ll have dreams that are so real and unique that I immediately run over and write them down, so I don’t forget. Later on, I usually find my dreams don’t logically make a lot of sense, but I start to mull over some of the more interesting parts, and usually before the day is done, I’ve got a great story idea.

Another way I come up with my ideas is that I’ll think of a really challenging situation or a really unusual character. Then, while I’m going about my day, I’ll slowly build on that single idea until I’ve got the plot for an entire book.

I often read about author’s running out of ideas. I’m not worried about running out of ideas, so much as, I’m worried that I’ll never find the time to take the best ones and create something really spectacular with them.

Struggling for ideas? Here are some suggestions:

  • Find a picture online and try to write something about it
  • “People watch” when you’re out and about. See if you can create a story behind a person.
  • Look for an unusual object and tell the story of where it came from and how it ended up there.
  • Listen to a song and see what it inspires you to write
  • Think of a really neat setting and build a story around it

How do you come up with ideas?

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